Don’t You Think You Should Lose a Few Pounds?

Who hasn’t thought that they could drop a couple pounds. But how does it feel when the pressure of the media pushes your own family to ask you that same question?

Reality TV has taken over the television airwaves. With channels like Bravo, E!, and MTV, who have begun to spend more time on reality shows than any other, it is not wonder it is taking over our lives. One show that has dominated E! for years is Keeping Up With the Kardashians.

On an episode a couple years ago Khloe Kardashian was asked to pose naked for the PETA I’d Rather Go Naked Than Wear Fur campaign. During this episode, step-father Bruce Jenner asked her if she thought she should lose a little weight before posing naked. Khloe Kardashian is 5’10”, wears a size 8, and weighs between 165-170 pounds. According to The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention the average body measurements of US women over the age of 20 is a height of 5’3″ and weight of 164.7 pounds (2009). So why do people constantly berate Khloe for being an “ogre” or a “fat cow” if she is technically the average weight of an American woman, yet she is seven inches taller! Have we become that warped that if someone in the public eye isn’t 5’10” and 115 pounds we think they are HUGE?

With mainstream networks showing programs like the Victoria Secret Fashion Show or America’s Next Top Model how are we not expected to think that women in entertainment should be tall and thin. What’s more disturbing is the mere fact that instead of being supportive of someone like Khloe Kardashian we, and her step-father Bruce, think she should lose weight before posing for a naked ad campaign. Our media has brainwashed us to the point that we belittle someone in the entertainment industry who doesn’t fit the super model criteria, yet, 79% of the US population is overweight. We sit back on our couches guzzling down empty calories and judge people on TV for being fat, while really it’s the average American who should lose a few pounds.

Center for Disease and Control Prevention. (2009). Body Measurements Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/bodymeas.htm

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